Letters to the Editor

Seem corruption and white collar crimes on the rise

Thursday, July 26, 2018

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Dear Editor,

White collar crime is nothing new, but in recent years we seem to be hearing about many more of these cases in the news. Prominent, well-educated individuals seem to be risking it all to defraud and corrupt, using non-violent means to commit devious and conniving deeds for financial gain and greed.

They risk ruining their careers and reputation while possibly spending time behind bars. They don't seem to think of the possible consequences, and I've often wondered why. Is it that they think they are so “big” they can get away easily with forgery and fraud?

We have seen a number of attorneys, especially, being brought before the courts, and recently a former hotelier was charged for alleged crimes.

The corruption in public entities, including the recent Petrojam allegations, should put the nation on alert that things are getting out of hand.

I do believe that institutions of higher learning need to place greater emphasis on teaching the importance of ethics and professionalism, since too many individuals seem to take these crucial tools of management for granted in their careers.

I agree with Prime Minister Andrew Holness that newly appointed ministers and heads of agencies should attend special boot camps to review critical management principles in areas such as human relations, finance, audit and control, as well as ethics and professionalism. Without this, some may only see their appointment as a 'free-for-all', unfortunately, especially where large sums are at stake.

P Chin

chin_p@yahoo.com

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