Horse Racing

Winning the Derby as perennial as the grass — Charles Hussey

…says riding Terremoto to victory in the big race was like driving an automatic Benz

BY HURBUN WILLIAMS
Observer writer

Friday, June 21, 2019

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FOUR-time champion jockey Charles “Bogleman” Hussey has the unique distinction of winning three Derbies, two in Jamaica and one in Trinidad and Tobago.

Commenting on this signature event, Hussey pointed out that the Blue Riband event is a race that will forever be in the minds of horsemen to win.

“It is an event which every trainer and jockey look forward to winning. It is the ultimate race that we all hanker and want to win as it does have more prestige and glory than any other race.

“Like, for example, this weekend coming up, all trainers and jockeys alike are getting themselves geared up to try and win that race for it is all about winning this race; the Derby is a very special and momentous event for horse racing.

“To have won the Derby, the occasion will always remain alive as it is as perennial as the grass,” Hussey said with obvious conviction in his tone of voice.

“It's like 20/30 years from now, I can always say — 'I won the Derby', that is what the event is all about, inseparable longevity. So, good luck to all those competing in the 99th Jamaica Derby next weekend and let's hope for clean racing throughout,” Hussey implored.

Being an ultra-special event, how did you as a jockey prepare, Hussey was asked.

“Like any other race really. The procedure is, I just set about to prepare myself both physically and mentally and try to put my best effort forward on the day and then hope for the best,” Hussey said.

Hussey's two Derby victories in Jamaica were Wells Fargo in 1994 and Terremoto in 1998. His winner in Trinidad was also Terremoto.

Of the lot, Hussey said Terromoto was the easiest ride for him.

“Of all my Derby victories, Terremoto was the easiest of the lot while Wells Fargo was quite different.

“I had to really ride Wells Fargo. He was a hard horse to ride. He came from way off the pace. I remember that race distinctly in 1994. I had to ride him (the horse) for the whole mile and a half journey. It was a hard race. A hard horse to ride but at the least, he won.

“On the contrary, the easiest was Terremoto in 1998. He had gear shifts. It was like driving an automatic Benz. You just had to press a button and he just got going with the minimum of fuss,” Hussey shared with publication.


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