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JCA stops games for Pat

JAAA vows to carry on his dream

BY ALICIA SUTHERLAND
Staff reporter
sutherlanda@jamaicaobserver.com

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

KENDAL, Manchester — President of the Jamaica Cricket Association (JCA) Wilford “Billy” Heaven said that competitions scheduled for last Saturday, the day the service of thanksgiving was held for late sports administrator Patrick “Pat” Anderson, were postponed as a mark of respect.

He told a gathering out at the Kendal Conference Centre in Manchester that the late Anderson contributed to the game at different levels and in various capacities for decades, and was appointed a life member of the organisation.

Heaven said that the JCA, in protecting and preserving Anderson's legacy, will be naming the trophy for the reformatted primary school cricket competition in honour of the man who is responsible for initiating cricket at that level in Jamaica.

Olympians Deon Hemmings-McCatty and Madrea Hyman recalled how Anderson selflessly moulded their athletic careers.

Patrick Anderson's love of track and field, cricket and football was noted as well as his wider appetite for sports, a passion which redounded to the benefit of the many young people whom he inspired.

“The beneficiaries of Pat's largesse number in the thousands for the years I have known him. For this we all have to give thanks [to] the parish of Manchester and by extension Jamaica and the Caribbean,” said Dr Paul Auden, who is also an avid sportsman and was his personal physician.

Alando Terrelonge, who represented Minister of Culture, Entertainment and Sports Olivia Grange, told Anderson's family that Jamaica shares the loss, but simultaneously it was a celebration of the life of a man who was truly a “one-of-a-kind human being”.

Despite Anderson's many contributions and acknowledgements at the service that he lived a full life, president of the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) Dr Warren Blake said he had an unfinished goal that they would fight to make a reality.

“He continued agitating for synthetic service at Kirkvine (track) to serve the needs of Central Jamaica. I will dare use this opportunity to call on the decision makers of ALCAN (now Windalco) to help to make this dream of his a reality…” he said.

Along with ALCAN, Blake said the other stakeholders that will be involved in making that dream come to life should also build a mini stadium and “appropriately” name it in honour of Anderson.

“…We will do everything in our power to see to it that Pat's dream will come true at Kirkvine,” he said.

The West Kingston-born Anderson, also affectionately called “Dust”, “Pops” “Bunny”and “Uncle Bunny,” who later made Manchester his home, was said to have had an early example as a nurturer from his father, who took care of him and his siblings after his mother passed when he was 10 years old.

Later, Father Hugh Sherlock, an active figure in the development of youth and community in Boys' Town in the inner city of Kingston, became a role model for how he lived his life in many respects.

According to his eulogy, one of the ways his critical- and creative-thinking skills were evident as a youngster was when he became apprentice to a tailor when he wanted to start wearing long khaki pants instead of the short pants he had in order to prevent teasing.

His ability to think critically is said to have served him well and resulted in his many accomplishments in the sporting arena.

The Jones Town Elementary and Kingston Technical graduate is said to have honed his love for sports when technical schools could not enter in mainstream competitions.

Much of Anderson's support to sports and as a benefactor was backed by bauxite company ALCAN, where he was employed for many years.

He was also life member of the Jamaica Football Federation, the Manchester Football Association and the Manchester Cricket Association.

A suggestion made in the eulogy is that the Order of Distinction Officer class that he was invested with for his contributions should be upgraded to Commander class.